Naval Ravikant

Open Letter To Naval Ravikant | Business Entrepreneurship

Mentor to millions and founder of Angellist Naval Ravikant

Naval Ravikant Business Entrepreneurship
Naval Ravikant (Source)

Dear Naval,

You have been massaging my earlobes for years now. Thank you for the timeless value.

I stumbled across you because of Farnam Street. Wetting my interest I hastily listened your interview on the Knowledge Project. Whilst in the throws of consumption I did my best to write down the little morsels of personal relevancy yourself and Shane imparted but it was too much! Those morsels are the majority of the show. You handled each corner Shane took you through with tightly wrapped, clear speech. It is one of the most impressionable bits of media I have ever consumed. Your nonchalant dismissal of macroeconomics as measuring stick stands out as evidence of your superior thinking. You lean on Nassim Taleb in justifying this comment and rightfully so, but for someone to dismiss as fundamental and accepted a system of measurement as macroeconomics requires uncommon insight and clarity. Yet, you dismantled the corrupt political bedrock of macroeconomics as casually as you recited your morning’s workout routine.

Backdrop my listening experience was the stuffy, crowded window seat of my Flix Bus. I was on a ten hour long journey from Bari to Roma. The route was regretfully more highway than Italian countryside but it’s funny how ingrained your sensory context is wrapped up in memory. I remember the moods of people driving as we slowly passed cars in the traffic jam, sat in a lost gaze whilst you un ironically asserted that life was meaningless.

I am writing you this letter with two purposes in mind.

  1. To pass on my appreciation for the inspiration and actionable knowledge you have imparted upon me and undoubtedly thousands of others.
  2. Offer an open invitation to coffee and beers.

Appreciation and Gratitude

You have measured metrics I am sure. Metrics which tell you a story of success through downloads, likes and comments. However, you should know that you successfully signal to us your disinterest in attention and commercialisation. The overwhelming impression I get from you is that your intention is simply to spread knowledge as far and wide as you can. Egoless and without a commercial bent. Thank you Naval.

I am writing this on January the 2nd of 2020 and it is no surprise to see so many people include at least one of your interviews in their top podcasts of the previous decade. The most common response I saw was your appearance on Joe Rogan and your personal podcast, ‘How To Get Rich’. It is furthermore no surprise to read peoples sincere appreciation of you in various comment sections. Or hear how you are certain podcasters most requested guest. None of this is pointed out with the purpose of blowing smoke, rather it is confirmation of my own thinking. Tripping over you on Farnam Street has added a splendid value to my life.


Podcast – ‘What About When’

My podcast is unpublished, unknown and amateur. I have recorded several interviews with some very interesting people. The purpose of the podcast is to send a message to young people (aged 20-25). The message that although their path is unclear and the only certainty of the future tumult, the podcast can confirm for them everyone’s been there. Even those who made it to the tippy top of happiness, success, wealth or knowledge. The top of anything. My purpose for the podcast is to reassure young people that although they are confused they are not alone, and hopefully that message will be inspiration enough to keep on going.

The podcast is called ‘What About When’ and – taking the advice of Tim Ferriss – I have made the podcast to “scratch my own itch”. I was myself directionless and anxious about wasting time doing this thing over that thing. I had no-one to lean on for advice or guidance beyond, ‘do what makes you happy’, while in the next sentence saying, ‘don’t do that, you need a real job, you need to be financially secure’. Through podcasts, I eventually found refuge in you and other like minded creators over the years who offered a more nuanced message. ‘You will fail, it will be hard, add value, and with some luck, you might get there’.

I would ask you on the show to speak specifically about your years aged 20-30. What were you doing? Who were you with? What doubts did you have? When did you embarrass yourself? How often were you questioning everything? I ask my guests to answer these questions to quell the angst of my target listeners. The podcast can offer you no exposure and no compensation, but it can offer you what seems to be your current measure of time well spent. I can offer you a platform to help others.


Parting Words

Naval, if by some miracle of SEO you have come across this post, it would mean so much to hear from you (rdfaulknerhogg@gmail.com). Yourself, alongside with Tim Ferriss, Christopher Hitchens, Rolf Potts and Jordan Peterson have had such an impact on my life that I am in debt to you all a significant sum that at this moment I have not the means to pay.

All I can say is thank you for sharing your wisdom and I hope I have the pleasure of meeting you one day.

Ryan.

2 thoughts on “Open Letter To Naval Ravikant | Business Entrepreneurship”

  1. Pingback: Half Year Review: 2020 | Atlas Geographica

  2. Pingback: Q&A With Tim Denning | Atlas Geographica

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *